© Lizzie Daly

Paul Wachiras’ days are very varied at Loisaba. One day he can be in Ewaso organising a medical clinic and another discussing grazing plans with morans and community elders in P & D. Below he gives us an account of his work, the main focus of which is assisting our neighboring communities with healthcare and education.

Every Monday I take Kaltouma, Loisaba’s clinical officer to Ewaso Dispensary to attend to patients there. On average, there are 25 to 30 patients at the clinic for Kaltouma to attend too. In partnership with Ewaso Dispensary, we also conduct medical outreach clinics in areas where access to healthcare is limited. The last clinic held at Sagumai was attended by 80 patients.

© Izzy Parsons

In partnership with Loisaba Community Conservation Foundation, Kimanjo Health Centre and Ewaso Dispensary, a training session on the negative effects of undergoing FGM was held in October 2017. Many parents were willing for their girls not to undergo the cut so an alternative rite of passage was developed.

© Ambrose Letoluai

In December, sixty girls took part in this alternative rite of passage ceremony thereby becoming women without having to undergo FGM. Interestingly the girls’ circumciser was present at the meeting and has vowed never again to do the cutting, she is now employed at the Ewaso Dispensary and her salary is funded by LCCF.

A very important aspect of my work  is ensuring good relationships with neighboring communities, especially in terms of grazing. I spend much of my time with morans and community elders discussing the importance of rangeland management. If there have been any issues in the local area I will also attend the meetings.

Another part of my work which I love is the education days that we hold at Loisaba with schools from the neighboring communities. These days are held in partnership with the Nature Consevancy, LCCF, Elewana, Space for Giants and San Diego Zoo. We teach the students about the importance of conservation and make them appreciate at a tender age about the environment. I think these days are really important because the children are the next generation so they will help to conserve for future generations. So far 90 students have attended these days from 5 different schools accompanied by 15 teachers.

© Lizzie Daly

 

By: Izzy Parsons

1 reply
  1. John Leshalote
    John Leshalote says:

    I love the work done by Loisaba, as a conservationists we need to embrace peaceful coexistence with adjacent communities because they too determine in the efforts made to secure the future of our wildlife and their habitats.

    Reply

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